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  • About / Bio

    While my work is for the most part representational, it's all culled from my imagination. Subjects, though recognizable, are the results of my own distilled, interpretive reality. Different works contain repeated motifs(trademarks?) often ordinary and mundane perhaps, but treated with and to some degree, distorted by my own personal vision.

    My inspiration is largely antiquity. And while not that of say, grand but decaying antebellum plantation homes, surrounded by moss draped oaks(not unreasonable for a southeastern Louisianian like myself), more that of the not-so-distant, and less so grandiose. Rusting piles of automotive or industrial scrap, piled in the yards of derelict filling stations and barnyards inspire the acutest of nostalgia, not to mention a dazzling array of oxidizing, cracking, and crazing surfaces. From childhood, the aging, peeling paint facades of once-grand drive-ins and miniature golf courses of the eastern Gulf Coast's "Redneck Riviera", along with some of their accompanying inhabitants, have been among the sources of my greatest inspiration.

    Drawing with pencils is my most oft used medium, and is where most of my imagery is born. Most drawings are highly worked, often blended and smeared with stumps and with reductive erasing to form light tonalities. Drawings are rarely used as studies for specific paintings, but are borrowed from cumulatively to formulate painted compositions.

    I paint in acrylics, and in conjunction with a heat gun, can dry and layer paint rapidly. This allows for quick and frequent alterations, repairs of mistakes, and a rapid buildup of impasto. Most of my compositions are "drawn" thickly, then colored by transparent glazes, the various colors of which are often not mixed, but layered wet over dry. This results in a luminous depth of color, and creates a nice patina on the paint- stroke/impasto "relief".

    As I continue to work, the subjects of my paintings have in some instances become a little more abstract. The once literal depictions of rustic scenes have in some works morphed into compositions of objects and shapes rendered with less specificity, and a greater emphasis on the random shapes, colors and forms one might encounter in an old, ramshackle environment. Compositions of more dynamic but less identifiable subject could be the result, and one worth pursuing.

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